Manokalanipo....

We caught the first flight to Kaua'i on Friday to take care of business. First stop was Nawiliwili to greet the Sun. E Ala E. There were nice kupuna faces in the sky. Especially the bright eyed one in the upper right hand corner...

Then we were off to Lihu'e for a big meeting with the Mayor of Kaua'i, Federal Highways, State Department of Transportation and many Native Hawaiian practitioners about the proposed controversial bike path through sacred Wailuanuiaho'ano. I snapped a picture when most people cleared the room...

Then we shot down to Koloa to brief Trustee Cataluna on the meeting outcome and then meet up with bruddah Rupert, Billy, Kane and Randy to visit Kaneiolouma Heiau...

Bruddah Kane sharing his mana'o with Jerome regarding cultural significance of the heiau complex...

Referencing Henry Kekahuna's map of Kaneiolouma Heiau from the 1960's showing the various components...

One of the pohaku idols still intact and watching over the restoration of Kaneiolouma Heiau. Kaneiolouma. Kane who pushes and shoves...

Amazingly, although in disrepair, the heiau is still mostly intact...

Then we were off to Wailua to meet up with the Sierra Club to inspect an old canal road which may be a more appropriate path for the bikes and less culturally invasive. I made this woman anonymous so she can't be prosecuted and I have no recollection or memory of this event...

After walking around the area of Cocopalms, we ran into another concerned citizen who asked that we take a quick look at a trail access issues around Lepe'uli beach...

Also known as Larsen's Beach, many people die here from drowning. The tally was thirteen so far on the sign. Hidden rip currents catch unsuspecting swimmers and snorkelers by deadly surprise...

It truly is a beautiful beach. Often overtaken by nudists unfortunately...

The calm waters have pockets of quick death to the unknowing...

Then I made my way to Ko'olau Church cemetery to visit 'ohana...

My grandfather's grave. He drowned at Moloa'a beach, not too far from Lepe'uli, when my mom was only four years old. First time I visited his grave as an adult, I felt him hug me and I sobbed my guts out. I will never forget that...

Then we made the drive all the way up to Wainiha and Ha'ena to visit the kupuna being built upon at Naue. We visited them and fixed up the ahu on the beach there. Racing against the onset of darkness...

Then we marveled at the sky full of stars while on the blackened beach...

Then we made our way back to Lihu'e to catch our 10:50p.m. flight back home. When we arrived at the airport, two bruddah's were playing their last song of the night as we made it through security. It was "Hawai'i 78" and a beautiful rendition at that. We took that as a powerful ho'ailona of our day and our continued mission to save the last vestiges of our beautiful cultural landscape and the old Hawai'i...

The plane ride was full of contemplation, a sense of accomplishment, and a sense of despair. It was a profoundly beautiful day. Mahalo Ke Akua. Mahalo e na kupuna...

Comments

Lance M. Foster said…
BEAUTIFUL...and you can see the complexity of the currents at the deadly beach

The fight is beautiful and hopeless.
All the MORE beautiful
because it is so hopeless.
Like life, which is beautiful
All the MORE beautiful
because it ends all too soon

Thank you for that trip and reminding me why I will never regret fighting those fights in my own time, even if we lost so many...
Ka`iana said…
Beautifully said brother...vivid memories of the battles and site visits...Makenau in Ka'u with beautiful Keolalani...the fight continues...your legacy continues...something tells me that when we cross-over...we will continue the fight...anyway we can... : )

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