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Sunday, July 13, 2008

Revelations...


It was an intense day on Friday as a kahea went out that construction was underway in our Hawaiian cemetery. Powerful emotions and a strange energy filled the air. We gathered on the beach with those who have maintained a constant vigil over the iwi of our beloved kupuna. The construction crews worked over time to start the race to construct the foundation of the home so that by the time any court action comes in requesting a restraining order. They could claim vested rights in the home already. They erected large dust screens around the perimeter of the property to keep us from seeing what was happening within. We heard the sound of a back hoe digging amongst the graves. We tried to witness the work and videotape it but the dust screens were blocking everything. We prayed and chanted to our kupuna on the other side of the veil. We know enough now that the cemetery is made up of mostly women and children.


At one point, the construction workers stormed out under the screen and onto the beach. Yelling ensued. Words were exchanged. Physical violence threatened by all. Then the flurry of Hawaiian curses flew back and forth in a furious engagement. Police were called by both sides. They responded and threatened arrest. We continued our kahea to our kupuna on the other side of the fence. On the other side of life. A neighbor allowed us to utilize their second floor lanai to videotape the excavation. Police returned again. Some left the beach due to overwhelming emotions. Some advocated storming in to stop the machines. Some advocated calling upon the ancestors to intervene. In the end. It was a glimpse of the power of forgiveness. Of love. Of Aloha. Which momentarily spread light on the darkness of the day. Just a glimpse. But it was so intensely powerful. Ke Akua entered the house. And the sky was filled with pained faces in a non-stop exhibition of the presence of the kupuna witnessed by many. They were called. They came. Where we go from here, we know not. But our kupuna surely do. Eo mai e na kupuna i hala...

3 comments:

Denise said...

I am greatly saddened that such a thing can happen. It is sacrilegious to disturb a cemetary. Why on earth would they do that?

Ka`iana said...

Mahalo Denise...it is truly sad when money overrides basic respect for what many people hold sacred...

Denise said...

Very sad indeed.